Tag: art collection

Marcel Rau: a versatile artist

Walking from Brussels Central Station to the National Bank of Belgium’s Temporary Museum, you can’t fail to notice round sculptures dotting the walls on both sides of the National Bank of Belgium’s head offices. Depicting a variety of occupations, these sculpted roundels are the work of Marcel Rau, the artist tasked with the decorative aspect of the new premises built after the Second World War.

Money can’t buy happiness

A display case in Room 3 of the National Bank’s Temporary Museum contains a small painting depicting a wealthy man frightened by a skeleton playing a musical instrument. Nearby you can see an emergency banknote featuring skeletons dancing. What was the reason for depicting such macabre scenes on banknotes, and what is the connection between the painting and money? Find out in this edition of “Spotlight”!

Pointillism in the digital era: Robert Silvers’ photomosaic

Anyone who has visited the Temporary Museum must have noticed a gigantic 500-euro banknote there. This banknote appeals to one’s imagination, as it measures 1.20 metres in height and 2.30 metres in width. When standing closer, you can see that it consists of thousands of other banknotes.

There’s a cow in the museum!

After all the banknotes and coins on display at the National Bank of Belgium’s Temporary Museum, in the fifth room a large cow makes a sudden appearance. But just what is this animal doing here?

Herman Richir (1866-1942): a painter for the National Bank of Belgium

Last month, the Bank’s art collection acquired a new canvas signed in the name of Herman Richir (1866-1942).

Art or money. The world of Jacques Charlier.

Can art save the world? This is a question which already made many generations of artists, curators and spectators think deep. The question stayed in spite of all this attention unanswered, and maybe it is even better so. Ensor ou le sens des images makes however, as it seems, fun of this whole discussion. Is it possible that the specific view of the Liegois artist Jacques Charlier is to blame?

Art and Money

The National Bank of Belgium supports like a number of other companies and central banks contemporary artists. Since the acquired works are hung up on the walls of its premises, they are not usually seen by the public. From time to time a work is presented in a public hall, like the Museum of the NBB, where it can be admired by the public at large.

Money, source of vanity: a pictorial warning

Frans Francken II, a talented Flemish painter (Antwerp, 1581-1642) who ran an important workshop in his hometown, belonged to an artistic family. Both his father and his son were painters as well, although he was the most productive and the best known of the Francken dynasty.